Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

The astrological birth chart consists of all Planet, Sun, Moon, Signs of Increase and Eaglewood. The placement of this component is recorded in Roda 12 House. The Rising Sign or Ascendant is a constellation that is on the eastern horizon at the time of your birth and determines the start of the first house. 11 other houses are placed counter-clockwise around the wheel.
Every planet has connections to other heavenly bodies in your birth chart. This relationship is measured in degrees and is called ASPECT. When the planet is in aspects 0, 60, 90, 120, or 180 degrees, this is called the main aspect. When the planet is in separation aspect 30, 45, 72, 135, 144 or 150 degrees, they are considered minor aspects.

Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

Every sign has a powerful planet, and the planet and the sign are said to be in control of a particular house and every house represents a plane of life.

The first house was ruled by Leo and Sun. The Leo symbol is a Lion, the element is Fire and it is a Fixed sign. Leo represents Heart and Back in the human body and the first home represents the ‘Self’ Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

The second house is ruled by Cancer and the Moon. The cancer symbol is Crab, the element is Water and it is a Cardinal sign. Cancer represents the Stomach and the Breast in the human body and the second house represents ‘Money’

The third house is ruled by Gemini and Mercury. The Gemini symbol is the Twins, the element is Water and it is a Mutable sign. Gemini represents the Hands, Arms and Lungs in the human body and the third house represents Brothers and sisters, Communication, Education, Ideas, Problem Solving.

The Fourth House is ruled by Taurus and Venus. The symbol of Taurus is the Bull, the element is Earth and it is a permanent sign. Taurus represents the Throat in the human body and the Fourth house represents the Residences and the property.

The Fifth House is ruled by Aries and Mars. The symbol of Aries is Ram, the element is Fire and it is the sign of the Cardinal. Aries represents the Head in the human body, and impulsively, often rushing forward to various things, and the Fifth house represents Family, Fun, Love Life, Pleasure and Romance. Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

The Sixth House is ruled by Pisces and Neptune. The symbol of Pisces is Two Fish, the element is Water and it is a Mutable sign. Pisces represents Legs in the human body and the sixth house represents the Work Environment and Social Survival.

The Seventh House is ruled by Aquarius and Uranus. The Aquarius symbol is Water Bearer, the element is Water and it is a Fixed Sign. Aquarius represents Ankles, Calf’s and the Blood on the human body and the seventh house represents Adaptation, Change, Enemy, Involvement, Challenges and Marriage.

The Eighth House is ruled by Capricorn and Saturn. Capricorn’s symbol is a Goat, its element is Earth and it is the sign of the Cardinal. Capricorn represents Knees in the human body and the eighth house represents Establishment, Inheritance, Legal Matters, Mortgage and Personal Personality.

The ninth house is ruled by Sagittarius and Jupiter. Symbol Sagittarius is a Centaur, half human half horse, the element is Fire and it is a Mutable sign. Sagittarius represents the Thigh in the human body and the ninth house represents foreign languages, higher education, international communication, long distance travel and spirituality.

The tenth house is ruled by Scorpio and Pluto. The Scorpio symbol is Scorpion, the element is Water and it is a Fixed sign. Scorpio represents the Sex Organs in the human body and home to 10 represents Career, Work or Profession.

The House of the Eleventh is ruled by Libra and Venus. The Libra symbol is Scales, the element is Water and that is the Cardinal’s mark. Libra represents the Kidneys in the human body and the eleven houses represent Clubs, Friendships, Networks, Platonic Relations and Social Groups. Astrology – Christmas Diagram Explained

Twelve houses are ruled by Virgo and Mercury. The Virgo symbol is Virgin, the element is Earth and it is a Mutable sign. Virgo represents the Intestine in the human body and the twelfth house represents Hospitals, Monasteries, Prisons, Psychiatric Institutions and Retreats.

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Whether you’re a seasoned diver or just starting out, there’s an undeniable romanticism and sense of adventure around wreck dives that you won’t be able to get elsewhere. The excitement builds while you’re in a speedboat zipping through the immense expanse of blue, wind whipping your hair and you into a frenzy. Often you’ll not spot any signs of civilisation as far as the eye can see and then, suddenly, with all your gear securely in place, it’s overboard and underwater into a magical world where ghostly ship remains loom as if from nowhere, waiting to be explored…
If this sounds tempting, the reality is much better. Do these thrilling historical sites offering spectacular dives, stunning reefs and enchanting folklore call to you? Great: here are three of the best this fine planet has to offer.

 

Townsville, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef is the a fabulous dive site any diver worth their salt has explored, and this British-built luxury passenger ship which fell victim to a cyclone back in 1911 is arguably its crowning jewel. Teeming with marine life and a spectacular ship in itself, if you’re only ever going to take the plunge with one wreck dive ever then this should be a strong contender.

Grand Anse, Grenada

The Bianca C has become known as the Titanic of the Caribbean after it sank in 1961 due to a boiler room explosion and consequent fire which lasted several days. At 180 metres (600 feet) long, this is the largest shipwreck you can dive in the Caribbean. If you have your full wreck dive insurance certifications then you’re in for even more fun as you’ll have multiple chances to enter the wreck.

Chuuk Lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia

Are you on the hunt for a travel destination which boasts a true wealth of wreck diving options? Then look no further than Micronesia. This little section of paradise in Oceania is undoubtedly the place for you. In years gone by it was thought to be the most formidable of Japanese strongholds in the whole of the Pacific during WWII, and Chuuk Lagoon was completely devastated after an American attack on the base back in 1944. 249 aircraft, 32 merchant ships and 12 warships sank, with over 20 wrecks having been discovered since. You’ll be like a kid in a sweetshop deciding which dives to do — some of the most popular include the 500 foot (153 metre) Shikoku Maru and the 440 foot (134 metre) Fujikawa Maru.

Mayday Mayday!

Not every travel insurance covers you for wreck diving, and some dive insurance won’t cover you below 18 metres. Let’s Go Insure’s dive insurance provides cover for up to 50 metres as long as you have the necessary qualifications. Get in touch with our team today to make sure your once in a lifetime dive insurance needs are met.

Discover Ireland’s Grand Canal on a Barge Cruise

Discover Ireland’s Grand Canal on a Barge Cruise

For your next holiday, take a barge cruise down the Grand Canal and travel from Dublin to Shannon to discover all Ireland has to offer. You can admire the gorgeous green countryside and delightful little cottages that line the waterway, while diving into its interesting and intricate history as a commercial route which allowed the surrounding towns to prosper.
Length and Route

 

The Grand Canal in Ireland extends for 117 kilometres. Passing through Leinster, it flows from Ringsend in Dublin to the Shannon Harbour in County Offaly. This is the main route, built to connect the capital city with the country’s midlands. The waterway does also have another run that spreads from Lowtown in Couty Kildare to the River Barrow in Athy. There are also various branches that link up with four other towns, though it’s worth mentioning that your barge cruise will probably stick to the main route.

Along the way, you can enjoy beautiful views of Irish towns and villages with their charming little cottages, while admiring the many bridges that arch over the smooth water. The fauna and flora also remain untouched, with grassy towpaths and side roads lining the waterway and adding to the iconic Irish countryside feel.

History of the Grand Canal

Though the canal was closed to commercial traffic in the mid-twentieth century, it has since been restored to its former glory and regularly welcomes a variety of boats and barge cruises. It still features the original 43 locks, five of which are, from an engineering point of view, particularly interesting as they are double locks. Back in the day, these would have allowed the traffic to move faster as two boats can pass at once and there’s more chance of reaching a lock that’s in your favour. The lock-keepers’ cottages have also been refurbished to celebrate the history of this canal…

Relationship with The Guinness Factory

…And what a history it is! The Grand Canal played a crucial role in the creation and development of the Guinness factory. In 1759, two years after the construction of the canal began, Arthur Guinness founded his famous brewery. Thanks to the waterway, he could transport heavy loads of the raw materials he needed far more cheaply and effectively than by road. It was also an ideal way of exporting his finished product. When you pass through the eighth lock on a barge cruise, keep your eyes peeled for the Guinness filter beds which are still used by Arthur’s company today.

Impact of the Famine

In the first half of the nineteenth century, Ireland’s economy began to fail. As people lost their jobs, the Commission for Public Works set them to work on creating the canal. This was a successful scheme until the potato crops failed and the Great Famine broke out. Work had to be halted as labour became scarce. Eventually, trade and commerce on the canal declined, particularly as the construction of the railroads had just started.

By the 1980s, the Grand Canal had become something of a dumping ground. Thankfully, in 1986 it received a funding injection that sought to rejuvenate the canal and restore it to its former glory. Today boat traffic from barge cruises has increased and thousands are able to enjoy this historic waterway.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge cruise itineraries. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.